Assessment and Certification

Criminal Justice Basic Abilities Test (CJBAT)

The Criminal Justice Basic Ability Test (CJBAT) program is a Florida Department of Law Enforcement entrance examination for Law Enforcement and Corrections Officer. The CJBAT is administered only in the State of Florida. Scores are used for employment in criminal justice agencies or entry into commission-certified training centers. Applicants, training schools and criminal justice agencies may access examination pass/fail results on the Florida Department of Law Enforcement website.


How long are the scores valid?

Scores are valid for four years.


How often may I take the CJBAT?

Candidates may take the assessment up to three times in a twelve month period. However, you may retake the same form only after a period of six months has elapsed.


What is the cost for the BAT?

The cost of the CJBAT Corrections Officer, CJBAT Law Enforcement and CJBAT Probation Officer is $50. Students may pay the fee of $50 by credit card or cash.

Effective June 1, 2014, the cost of the CJBAT Corrections Officer, CJBAT Law Enforcement and CJBAT Probation Officer will increase to $70.


How do I register for the CJBAT?

To schedule an appointment for the Criminal Justice Basic Ability Test, you do not have to be a Florida State College at Jacksonville student.

For more information, contact the appropriate assessment and certification center.


What is covered on the CJBAT?

The CJBAT assesses eight cognitive abilities. There are a total of 120 questions with 15 questions per cognitive abilities. The test is administered on the computer and is timed for two hours and 30 minutes.

Written Comprehension: Involves reading and understanding written words and sentences. You would use this ability when reading legal bulletins, Florida Statutes, ordinances, policies and procedures.

Written Expression: Involves writing words and sentences so others will understand. You would use this ability when it is necessary to write incident/use of force/discipline reports, memos, affidavits or narratives.

Problem Sensitivity: This is the ability to tell if something is wrong or likely to go wrong. You would use this ability while patrolling or interacting with individuals when you think that a situation is going to deteriorate or get worse. It could involve recognizing the symptoms of a physical problem requiring first aid, or determining the likelihood that a riot or other type of disturbance may occur. It could also involve judging the accuracy of data received.

Inductive Reasoning: The ability to combine separate pieces of information, or specific answers to problems to form general rules or conclusions. It involves the ability to think of possible reasons why things go together, such as giving a logical explanation for a series of events that seem unrelated. You would use this ability when performing any type of investigation to conclude that rules or laws have been violated.

Deductive Reasoning: This is the ability to apply rules to specific problems to come up with logical answers. This ability involves applying general rules to specific problems. You would use this ability when applying Florida Statutes or Florida Manual on Jail standards, policies and procedures to specific situations. Example: under what conditions to make an arrest or to decide the proper use of force, and in deciding which route to take when taking into account time and geography.

Information Ordering: The ability to correctly follow a rule or set of rules in order to arrange things or actions in a certain order. The rules must be given. The things or actions must be put in order and can include numbers, letters, words, pictures, procedures, sentences and logical operations. You would use this ability when making an arrest, issuing a warrant, transporting prisoners or conducting fire drills. It is also used in applying first aid, following a checkout procedure in operating equipment and arranging sentences in a meaningful paragraph

Memorization: Measures the ability of the candidate to view a picture and then respond to questions after the picture has been removed. Each series of pictures and questions are individually timed.

Spatial Orientation: Ability to tell where you are in relation to the location of some object, or to tell where the object is in relation to you. It involves maintaining directional orientation in one's bearings with respect to the points of a compass. This ability allows one to stay oriented in a vehicle as it changes direction and location. You would use this ability when out in the community patrolling and a call comes in that you must attend to. You must visualize where you are in relation to where you are going in order to be able to get there.


Additional Information

A study guide may be purchased in any campus bookstore or at Public Safety. The study guide is also on reserve in the Kent Campus Learning Center.

Out-of-state testing is no longer available. All testing must take place in Florida.

Length of assessment: About 2.5 hours.

Additional score reports are available for $5 for enrolled students and $10 for others.